Math 120 Trigonometry

Course Description

(3-0) 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 102 “C” or better, or an acceptable score on the COMPASS Placement Examination. Topics include: trigonometric functions, equations, and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications of these functions. This course may not be used for credit toward an engineering or science degree (except for interdisciplinary science, chemistry, and associate of arts).

Couse Learning Outcomes

A student who successfully completes this course should be able to:

  1. Identify the differences between radian units of measure compared to degree units of measure for angles
  2. Use the unit circle to derive values of the six trigonometric functions
  3. Solve trigonometric equations
  4. Define the six trigonometric functions
  5. Apply the Law of Sines
  6. Apply the Law of Cosines
  7. Utilize trigonometric identities to reduce expressions
  8. Define the proper inverse function in relation to a given trigonometric function
 

This course meets the BOR mandated GenEd Goal #5: Students will understand and apply fundamental mathematical processes and reasoning.
 

Student Learning Outcomes

As a result of taking a course meeting this goal, students will:

  1. Use mathematical symbols and mathematical structure to model and solve real world problems.
    • Assessment- On a class exam, quiz, and / or homework assignment students will be asked to demonstrate the use of trigonometric functions to model a real world problem.
     
  2. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills related to mathematical terms
    • Assessment- On a class exam, quiz, and / or homework assignment students will be asked to demonstrate appropriate communication skills related to the mathematical terms and concepts that are associated with trigonometric functions.
     
  3. Demonstrate the correct use of quantifiable measurements of real world situations
    • Assessment- On a class exam, quiz, and / or homework assignment students will be asked to demonstrate the correct use of quantifiable measurement for real world situations. For example, the differences between degree measure and radian measure, the differences between period and frequency, and the properties of inverse functions can each play an important role in physical applications.