Research Inquiries

For inquiries related to SD Mines Research, contact:

Research Affairs

S.D. School of Mines & Technology
501 E. St. Joseph Street
Suite 102, O'Harra Building
Rapid City, SD  57701

(605) 394-2493

Research@Mines

Research@Mines

Research at Mines happens every day of the year, involves faculty and students at every academic level, and frequently includes collaboration across the state, the nation and the globe.

SD Mines Researchers Hope to Sanford Lab Extremophiles to Create Low-Cost Renewable and Biodegradable Polymers

Courtney Carlson, a senior majoring in Chemical Engineering at SD Mines (right) and researcher Navanietha Krishnaraj Rathinam, Ph.D., (left) work in the Chemical and Biological Engineering and Chemistry (CBEC) building at SD Mines. Carlson and Krishnaraj Rathinam are using benchtop reactors in the lab to perform CNAM-Bio research that seeks to optimize and scale-up the manufacturing of biopolymers from lignocellulosic biomass using extremophiles. The center is a scanning electron microscope image of the bacteria the research team are studying.

A team of researchers with the Composite and Nanocomposite Advanced Manufacturing – Biomaterials Center (CNAM), led by David Salem, Ph.D., at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology are using microbes that were discovered deep underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in an attempt to make low-cost plastics that are renewable and biodegradable.

“Most commercial polymers, or plastics are petroleum based which is a non-renewable resource,” says Salem. The team is working to find ways to mass manufacture low-cost plant based plastics and composites. “A problem with bio-based polymers is they are expensive, and one goal of this center is to use genetically engineered microbes to help reduce the cost of manufacturing these kinds of plastics,” says Salem. “Another goal is to engineer the properties of the biopolymers and biocomposites to serve a wide range of commercial applications.”

There is a huge potential for new green-based manufacturing jobs in the area if the center succeeds in developing mass manufacturing techniques for turning plants into low-cost bio-based polymers.

“The top ten petroleum based polymers make up about a $500-billion global market,” says Salem. “These biopolymers potentially can cover the whole range of properties of those.”

A group, led by Rajesh Sani, Ph.D., from SD Mines’ Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, have isolated th...

Last Edited 6/20/2017 10:39:43 AM [Comments (0)]

$1.5 Million NSF Grant Brings Native Students into STEM Fields at Three South Dakota Schools

South Dakota School of Mines student Bo Paulsen holds the stake, while Oglala Lakota College student Wilson King wields the sledge hammer under the supervision of OLC instructor Lyle Wilson. In the background are Mines students Lyndsey Penfield and Logan Gayton. They are part of a team of students who designed and built a greenhouse in Kyle, which was part of effort to increase local food production on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

Three schools in South Dakota are teaming up in a continued effort to encourage more Native American students to enter the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Oglala Lakota College, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology and the South Dakota State University were each awarded $495,000 grants from the National Science Foundation to evaluate the ongoing program and move the effort forward. The project, OLC, SDSU and SD Mines Pre-Engineering Education Collaborative (OSSPEEC), includes faculty, students, scientists and engineers working to solve real-world problems on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

The collaborative includes work to help Native students at OLC enter pre-engineering programs and then finish their degrees at South Dakota School of Mines or South Dakota State. The project also provides professional development for college educators to help boost the number of Lakota students who enter pre-engineering classes.

Jason Tinant is the OSSPEEC principal investigator at Oglala Lakota College where he is also an environmental science instructor. “Engineering is the application of science for the betterment of the community,” says Tinant. “This kind of engineering education can increase tribal sovereignty over water, food and language. This project embodies the Lakota ideals of “wolakociypai,” (learning the ways of the Lakota for the community) and “tiospaye” (the making of new relations),” he adds.  

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Last Edited 6/8/2017 10:43:03 AM [Comments (0)]

Mines Students Push to Preserve Gigantic Jurassic Dinosaur Bed in Utah

Mike LeSchin from the BLM shows SD Mines students a visitor center exhibit next to an Allosaurus fossil at the Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry during the class spring break trip to Utah. The students left to right are Tristan Walker, Andrew Schappert, Julie Manders, Nicole Ridgwell, and Megan Norr.

Students in the Paleontology Resource Management class at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology are leading a push to preserve and protect the largest known concentration of Jurassic dinosaur bones in the world. The site includes dinosaurs like the Allosaurus, an older carnivorous cousin of the more famous T. rex, and the Stegosaurus, the plant-eating dinosaur with a spiked tail and bony finned back.

Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry in central Utah is on federal Bureau of Land Management land.  But the widespread array of Jurassic dinosaur fossils at the quarry are protected only by aging metal buildings, almost open to the elements. Without careful preservation, the resources on the site could be lost to erosion, or even theft and vandalism.

“This class gives real-world experience to Mines students to build up the skills they need in working with or for federal, tribal, state and local government agencies when it comes to identifying and preserving rare paleontological resources for future generations,” said Sally Shelton, associate director of the SD Mines Museum of Geology.

Paleontology students traveled to Utah and visited the site over their spring break...

Last Edited 6/8/2017 10:13:34 AM [Comments (0)]

SD Mines Researchers Help Ensure a Clean Signal in Next-Gen Dark Matter Detector at Sanford Lab

Lab technician Rashyll Leonard completes connections for collecting radon from the LUX experiment underground at SURF during decommissioning, September 20, 2016. Photo credit: Dr. Eric Miller.

The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter detector in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead reached a major milestone this week. U.S. Department of Energy approval for the final design of the LZ experiment launches the construction phase and pushes the project toward the completion goal of April, 2020. Next-gen dark matter detectors have become sensitive enough that researchers around the world are now more confidently racing to be the first to directly observe the existence of dark matter particles. LZ is in direct competition with two projects in Italy and China. Researchers at South Dakota School of Mines &Technology are playing a key role in the detection and removal of radon from the sensitive equipment to ensure LZ has the cleanest signal possible.

"Physicists at Mines are playing a role in one of the most exciting physics experiments in the world,” said SD Mines President Heather Wilson.

LZ is being placed almost a mile underground to reduce the impact of cosmic rays that can hide the potential dark matter signal. But other types of background radiation and contamination can also produce false signals and hurt the effort to detect dark matter. Researchers must painstakingly measure all components of LZ for naturally occurring radiation. One challenge is the removal of radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that could interfere with dark ...

Last Edited 6/13/2017 10:34:47 AM [Comments (0)]