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For inquiries related to SD Mines Research, contact:

Research Affairs

S.D. School of Mines & Technology
501 E. St. Joseph Street
Suite 102, O'Harra Building
Rapid City, SD  57701

(605) 394-2493

Research@Mines - by Subject
Civil and Environmental Engineering

$1.5 Million NSF Grant Brings Native Students into STEM Fields at Three South Dakota Schools

South Dakota School of Mines student Bo Paulsen holds the stake, while Oglala Lakota College student Wilson King wields the sledge hammer under the supervision of OLC instructor Lyle Wilson. In the background are Mines students Lyndsey Penfield and Logan Gayton. They are part of a team of students who designed and built a greenhouse in Kyle, which was part of effort to increase local food production on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

Three schools in South Dakota are teaming up in a continued effort to encourage more Native American students to enter the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). Oglala Lakota College, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology and the South Dakota State University were each awarded $495,000 grants from the National Science Foundation to evaluate the ongoing program and move the effort forward. The project, OLC, SDSU and SD Mines Pre-Engineering Education Collaborative (OSSPEEC), includes faculty, students, scientists and engineers working to solve real-world problems on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

The collaborative includes work to help Native students at OLC enter pre-engineering programs and then finish their degrees at South Dakota School of Mines or South Dakota State. The project also provides professional development for college educators to help boost the number of Lakota students who enter pre-engineering classes.

Jason Tinant is the OSSPEEC principal investigator at Oglala Lakota College where he is also an environmental science instructor. “Engineering is the application of science for the betterment of the community,” says Tinant. “This kind of engineering education can increase tribal sovereignty over water, food and language. This project embodies the Lakota ideals of “wolakociypai,” (learning the ways of the Lakota for the community) and “tiospaye” (the making of new relations),” he adds.  

Last Edited 6/8/2017 10:43:03 AM [Comments (0)]

Turning Tomatoes Into Electricity

Dr. Venkata Gadhamshetty discusses research to turn tomato waste into energy resource.

When a South Dakota Mines research team announced in March that it had successfully generated power with tomato waste, the world and international media elite immediately took notice. After all, it’s not every day that you hear about fruit being converted into electricity.

The research group led by Dr. Venkata Gadhamshetty, Mines graduate students and a researcher each from Princeton University and Florida Gulf Coast University announced findings at the 251st National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in San Diego

Within hours, Dr. Gadhamshetty was interviewing with the BBC, and the news was written about by CNN, Newsweek, MSN, Yahoo news and the Times of India (to name a few), highlighting just one example of the important, world-changing research being conducted at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology in Rapid City.

The pilot project involves a biological-based fuel cell that uses tomato waste from harvests, grocery store shelves and production plants such as ketchup factories. The inherent characteristics of the decomposing leftovers make it a perfect fuel source for enhancing electrochemical reactions, Dr. Gadhamshetty says.

Researchers designed and built a new electrochemical device to test and extract electrons from the defective tomatoes. The power output from their mini reactor is small: 10 milligrams of tomato waste resulted in 0.3 watts of electr...

Last Edited 11/3/2016 02:40:14 PM [Comments (0)]