Research Inquiries

For inquiries related to SD Mines Research, contact:

Research Affairs

S.D. School of Mines & Technology
501 E. St. Joseph Street
Suite 102, O'Harra Building
Rapid City, SD  57701

(605) 394-2493

Research@Mines - by Subject
Marine Life

Mines Researchers Study Kootenai River Pollutants in Montana, Other Areas

South Dakota Mines student Emily Stickney conducts research on pollutants in the Kootenai River in Montana

A recent award by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is funding South Dakota School of Mines & Technology research on how changes in land use increase pollutants and influence the health of the Kootenai River and Lake Koocanusa in Montana, Idaho and British Columbia.

Recent land use changes in the Kootenai River watershed include increased coal mining and alterations to agricultural practices.

Dr. Lisa Kunza of the Department of Chemistry & Applied Biological Sciences, is heading a collaborative research team that includes students, other university partners, and agency collaborators. The team has already received $160,000 and is expecting to receive up to $400,000 for its efforts over the next five years.

Selenium and nitrate loads are on the rise in the Kootenai River as it enters Lake Koocanusa. Selenium is a metal found in natural deposits and may be exposed during mining activity. In 2012 alone, selenium loads into the river exceeded 29,000 pounds, a five-fold increase since 1992. There is heightened concern about possible buildup of selenium in fish tissue. Nitrate loads have increased substantially as well and may alter the resources available for fisheries. 

Endangered Kootenai White Sturgeon and other organisms in the river and reservoir could also be affected by the pollutants.

Emily Stickney from Boise, Idaho, is among the undergraduate and graduate student researchers ...

Last Edited 1/17/2017 09:45:02 AM [Comments (0)]

Amazon Research

In the Amazon River, three distinct water types collect to create a uniquely rich breeding ground for extreme aquatic life.

Laurie Anderson Explores How Marine Clams Found Their Way Into one of the World’s Largest Rivers

The Amazon River is teeming with life, from solitary four-hundred-pound catfish to shoals of eight-pound piranha. But in the Amazon basin around Santarem, Brazil—where white water, clear water, and black water rivers pool together—it’s the ancient tiny mollusks that have captured the attention of Mines researcher Dr. Laurie Anderson.

The three distinct water types collect here to create a uniquely rich breeding ground for extreme aquatic life in one of the world’s largest rivers.

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Photo of Dr. Anderson by Mark Siddall, American Museum of Natural History

Anderson’s research interest is in a little known genus of typically saltwater Corbulidae clam from the last member of a once diverse radiation in the western Amazon. She has devoted much of her career to studying this clam and other family members in the fossil record, and her current research continues to explore its evo...

Last Edited 1/3/2017 08:43:26 AM [Comments (0)]