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Research@Mines Archive:
May, 2021

South Dakota Mines Professor Reflects on IceCube’s 10th Anniversary and Discoveries at the South Pole

Dr. Xinhua Bai, associate professor of physics at South Dakota Mines shown here at the South Pole (seated lower right) during his research in 1998. Dr. Bai is among a group of scientists whose work helped establish the international IceCube Collaboration, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this week.

Ten years ago, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory fully opened its eyes for the first time, the eyes that allow curious scientists to “see” signals from passing astrophysical neutrinos: mysterious, tiny, extremely lightweight particles created by some of the most energetic and distant phenomena in the cosmos. IceCube is a gigantic three-dimensional detector for high energy cosmic rays, whose origins remained unknown, after they were discovered over a century ago.

South Dakota Mines associate professor of physics, Xinhua Bai, Ph.D., is among the original “dreamers,” which included a few dozen scientists, who helped start the international IceCube Collaboration. Today, the diverse group of researchers includes over 350 scientists from 53 institutions in 12 countries and five continents.

“I was extremely lucky to be one of the early scientists on this collaboration. After I received my Ph.D., driven by my curiosity, I started as a winter over scientist for the Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array and the South Pole Air Shower Experiment  in 1998.” Bai says. “The...

Last Edited 5/13/2021 04:23:50 PM [Comments (0)]