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For inquiries related to SD Mines Research, contact:

Research Affairs

S.D. School of Mines & Technology
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Rapid City, SD  57701

(605) 394-2493

Research@Mines - by Subject
Geology

SoederGSAToday

Dan Soeder, director of the Energy Resources Initiative at South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, has co-authored the cover article in the September issue of GSA Today magazine. This photo published on the cover was taken by Soeder.

Dan Soeder, director of the Energy Resources Initiative (ERI) at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, has co-authored the cover article titled “When oil and water mix: Understanding the environmental impacts of shale development,” in the September 2018 issue of GSA Today, a magazine published by the Geological Society of America.

The article explores what is known and not known about the environmental risks of fracking with the intent of fostering informed discussions within the geoscience community on the topic of hydraulic fracturing. Soeder’s co-author is Douglas B. Kent of the United States Geological Survey.

In this paper, Soeder and Kent bridge the gap in consensus regarding fracking, providing current information about the environmental impacts of shale development. The article is open access and adheres to science and policy, presenting a complicated and controversial topic in a manner more easily understood by the lay person.

"Geoscientists from dinosaur experts to the people studying the surface of Mars are often asked by the public to weigh-in with their opinions on fracking. We wanted the broader geoscience community to be aware of what is kn...

Last Edited 9/14/2018 11:19:54 AM [Comments (0)]

SD Mines Paleontologist Lands Fulbright Scholarship to Study Invasive Species Impact

SD Mines alumnus Broc Kokesh has received a Fulbright Scholarship to study invasive species impact in Jamaica.

South Dakota School of Mines & Technology alumnus Broc Kokesh has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program award from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. Kokesh graduated with a master’s degree in paleontology in May. This Fulbright award takes him to Jamaica.  

Kokesh is studying how an ecosystem responds following the introduction of an invasive species. His work compares diversity between living mollusk (clams, snails, etc.) communities and co-occurring dead shells from the Kingston Harbor. His research examines the ecological effects of invasive green mussels, which were introduced in 1998 via ballast water from shipping traffic. However, since about 2010, green mussels appear to have receded in abundance for reasons unknown. Questions remain as to how the invasion affected native fauna, and Kokesh brings a paleontological perspective by focusing on dead shell diversity. Human-introduced invasive species are a global problem and this research may lend insight to invasive species management and impact in other parts of the world. 

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. The Fulbright Program is funded through an annual appropri...

Last Edited 8/3/2018 03:15:52 PM [Comments (0)]

Changing The Way Kosovo Mines

This group of Mines seniors took on a senior project evaluating Kosovo's mining industry and identifying ways to improve productivity.

What started as a senior design project could change the way Kosovo develops its country’s power.   

“This is very real-world,” says Andrea Brickey, Ph.D., associate professor in the SD Mines Mining Engineering and Management Department. “This design and plan is going to be shared with the mine management in Kosovo.”

Brickey assigned the senior design project to 10 of her SD Mines mining students after being contacted by a colleague, Hillary Smith, who had recently completed a fellowship in Kosovo with the U.S. State Department. The World Bank had recently backed Kosovo, a country in the Balkans region of Europe, in its plan to build a more efficient power plant. The United States has played a consulting role in helping the country improve its power capacity. With the power plant moving forward thanks to the World Bank backing, the next step was improving the country’s mining operations to feed the plant.

Currently, Kosovo gets 97 percent of its power from one lignite mine called the South Sibovc Coal Mine. These lignite mines are operated by the Kosovo Energy Company (KEK). Unfortunately, the mining technology, equipment a...

Last Edited 6/28/2018 01:04:20 PM [Comments (0)]

SD Mines Energy Resources Initiative Builds Momentum as US Production Peaks

Nine SD Mines students join Energy Resources Initiative director Dan Soeder on a hydraulic fracturing operation during a visit to the Bakken oilfields of North Dakota. The trip was funded by Halliburton.

One of the primary goals of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology’s Energy Resources Initiative (ERI) is to conduct research that improves the efficiency and reduces the environmental risks of producing fossil fuels while providing energy security for America.

While the country’s oil and gas industry has been in a down cycle, recent data shows US production is reaching a peak not seen since the 1970s due to increased development of shale oil and gas.  Dan Soeder, the new ERI director, is an industry expert on development of shale resources and reserves. Soeder is less than a year into his new position at SD Mines. He has spent this time quietly putting down roots to firmly establish the program. Soeder has been developing research projects, building relationships with industry and pursuing funding. The aim is for SD Mines to grow as a valuable industry resource, both in supplying future engineers for this sector and in providing solutions for efficient and safe oil and gas production.

Soeder left the U.S. Department of Energy last spring to become Mines’ first ERI director, bringing with him 30 years of experience as a hydrologist and a geologist, with a particular focus on shale gas, water resources, and sequestration of carbon dioxid...

Last Edited 6/28/2018 01:06:39 PM [Comments (0)]

Mines Students Push to Preserve Gigantic Jurassic Dinosaur Bed in Utah

Mike LeSchin from the BLM shows SD Mines students a visitor center exhibit next to an Allosaurus fossil at the Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry during the class spring break trip to Utah. The students left to right are Tristan Walker, Andrew Schappert, Julie Manders, Nicole Ridgwell, and Megan Norr.

Students in the Paleontology Resource Management class at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology are leading a push to preserve and protect the largest known concentration of Jurassic dinosaur bones in the world. The site includes dinosaurs like the Allosaurus, an older carnivorous cousin of the more famous T. rex, and the Stegosaurus, the plant-eating dinosaur with a spiked tail and bony finned back.

Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry in central Utah is on federal Bureau of Land Management land.  But the widespread array of Jurassic dinosaur fossils at the quarry are protected only by aging metal buildings, almost open to the elements. Without careful preservation, the resources on the site could be lost to erosion, or even theft and vandalism.

“This class gives real-world experience to Mines students to build up the skills they need in working with or for federal, tribal, state and local government agencies when it comes to identifying and preserving rare paleontological resources for future generations,” said Sally Shelton, associate director of the SD Mines Museum of Geology.

Paleontology students traveled to Utah and visited the site over their spring break...

Last Edited 6/8/2017 10:13:34 AM [Comments (0)]

Amazon Research

In the Amazon River, three distinct water types collect to create a uniquely rich breeding ground for extreme aquatic life.

Laurie Anderson Explores How Marine Clams Found Their Way Into one of the World’s Largest Rivers

The Amazon River is teeming with life, from solitary four-hundred-pound catfish to shoals of eight-pound piranha. But in the Amazon basin around Santarem, Brazil—where white water, clear water, and black water rivers pool together—it’s the ancient tiny mollusks that have captured the attention of Mines researcher Dr. Laurie Anderson.

The three distinct water types collect here to create a uniquely rich breeding ground for extreme aquatic life in one of the world’s largest rivers.

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Photo of Dr. Anderson by Mark Siddall, American Museum of Natural History

Anderson’s research interest is in a little known genus of typically saltwater Corbulidae clam from the last member of a once diverse radiation in the western Amazon. She has devoted much of her career to studying this clam and other family members in the fossil record, and her current research continues to explore its evo...

Last Edited 1/3/2017 08:43:26 AM [Comments (0)]