Research Inquiries

For inquiries related to SD Mines Research, contact:

Research Affairs

S.D. School of Mines & Technology
501 E. St. Joseph Street
Suite 102, O'Harra Building
Rapid City, SD  57701

(605) 394-2493

Research@Mines

Research@Mines

Research at Mines happens every day of the year, involves faculty and students at every academic level, and frequently includes collaboration across the state, the nation and the globe.

Mines Students Push to Preserve Gigantic Jurassic Dinosaur Bed in Utah

Mike LeSchin from the BLM shows SD Mines students a visitor center exhibit next to an Allosaurus fossil at the Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry during the class spring break trip to Utah. The students left to right are Tristan Walker, Andrew Schappert, Julie Manders, Nicole Ridgwell, and Megan Norr.

Students in the Paleontology Resource Management class at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology are leading a push to preserve and protect the largest known concentration of Jurassic dinosaur bones in the world. The site includes dinosaurs like the Allosaurus, an older carnivorous cousin of the more famous T. rex, and the Stegosaurus, the plant-eating dinosaur with a spiked tail and bony finned back.

Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry in central Utah is on federal Bureau of Land Management land.  But the widespread array of Jurassic dinosaur fossils at the quarry are protected only by aging metal buildings, almost open to the elements. Without careful preservation, the resources on the site could be lost to erosion, or even theft and vandalism.

“This class gives real-world experience to Mines students to build up the skills they need in working with or for federal, tribal, state and local government agencies when it comes to identifying and preserving rare paleontological resources for future generations,” said Sally Shelton, associate director of the SD Mines Museum of Geology.

Paleontology students traveled to Utah and visited the site over their spring break...

Last Edited 5/2/2017 08:19:17 AM [Comments (0)]

SD Mines Researchers Help Ensure a Clean Signal in Next-Gen Dark Matter Detector at Sanford Lab

Lab technician Rashyll Leonard completes connections for collecting radon from the LUX experiment underground at SURF during decommissioning, September 20, 2016. Photo credit: Dr. Eric Miller.

The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter detector in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead reached a major milestone this week. U.S. Department of Energy approval for the final design of the LZ experiment launches the construction phase and pushes the project toward the completion goal of April, 2020. Next-gen dark matter detectors have become sensitive enough that researchers around the world are now more confidently racing to be the first to directly observe the existence of dark matter particles. LZ is in direct competition with two projects in Italy and China. Researchers at South Dakota School of Mines &Technology are playing a key role in the detection and removal of radon from the sensitive equipment to ensure LZ has the cleanest signal possible.

"Physicists at Mines are playing a role in one of the most exciting physics experiments in the world,” said SD Mines President Heather Wilson.

LZ is being placed almost a mile underground to reduce the impact of cosmic rays that can hide the potential dark matter signal. But other types of background radiation and contamination can also produce false signals and hurt the effort to detect dark matter. Researchers must painstakingly measure all components of LZ for naturally occurring radiation. One challenge is the removal of radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that could interfere with dark ...

Last Edited 3/2/2017 03:33:48 PM [Comments (0)]

South Dakota Space Grant Awards $176,000 in NASA Funding to SD Mines and Five South Dakota Institutions

A team of Mines students working on a component of the National Solar Eclipse Balloon Project. This is one example of a research funded by the South Dakota Space Grant Consortium headquartered at Mines.

The South Dakota Space Grant Consortium (SDSGC) has provided nine awards totaling approximately $176,000 in NASA funding to SD Mines and five affiliate members of the Consortium.

The Space Grant Consortium, headquartered at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, is a statewide network of 20 member organizations from education, industry and government. As the link between NASA and the citizens of South Dakota, the Consortium’s mission is to instill the spirit of exploration and discovery in students, educators and the general public, with a special focus on the fields of science, technology, engineering and math that are essential for the development of the nation’s workforce.

One grant of $17,100 was awarded directly to a Mines student, Kari Pulli, a junior in mechanical engineering, as a scholarship for a project titled “Student CO-OP for Aerospace and High-Altitude Technology Development.”  Pulli was selected by officials at Raven-Aerostar for an eight-month student internship at its Sioux Falls facility. This is on top of a previously announced SDSGC grant of $25,000 to SD Mines for a project titled: “Computational Astronomy for Teachers and Their Students.

In total, nine winning projects were competitively selected from among 15 proposals submitted under the SDSGC’s FY2016 Project Innovati...

Last Edited 2/3/2017 10:02:17 AM [Comments (0)]

Mines Researchers Study Kootenai River Pollutants in Montana, Other Areas

South Dakota Mines student Emily Stickney conducts research on pollutants in the Kootenai River in Montana

A recent award by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is funding South Dakota School of Mines & Technology research on how changes in land use increase pollutants and influence the health of the Kootenai River and Lake Koocanusa in Montana, Idaho and British Columbia.

Recent land use changes in the Kootenai River watershed include increased coal mining and alterations to agricultural practices.

Dr. Lisa Kunza of the Department of Chemistry & Applied Biological Sciences, is heading a collaborative research team that includes students, other university partners, and agency collaborators. The team has already received $160,000 and is expecting to receive up to $400,000 for its efforts over the next five years.

Selenium and nitrate loads are on the rise in the Kootenai River as it enters Lake Koocanusa. Selenium is a metal found in natural deposits and may be exposed during mining activity. In 2012 alone, selenium loads into the river exceeded 29,000 pounds, a five-fold increase since 1992. There is heightened concern about possible buildup of selenium in fish tissue. Nitrate loads have increased substantially as well and may alter the resources available for fisheries. 

Endangered Kootenai White Sturgeon and other organisms in the river and reservoir could also be affected by the pollutants.

Emily Stickney from Boise, Idaho, is among the undergraduate and graduate student researchers ...

Last Edited 1/17/2017 09:45:02 AM [Comments (0)]